Critique Collective

Critique Collective is your source for information and interviews about emerging and established contemporary artists.

Tag: new media

JJ Brine’s VECTOR Gallery Explores Cultural Hybridity

VECTOR Gallery is among contemporary art’s foremost installation spaces, located at 40 Clinton Street in New York City and constructed by JJ Brine. The gallery operates in its own futuristic time zone as a means for disrupting reality within what Brine calls the PostHuman movement. VECTOR Gallery stands out from other avant garde installations as a space decoding cultural hybridity. VECTOR assimilates growing cultural movements under its PostHuman conceptual framework with an unabashed interplay between old and new as Brine intertwines religion and identity politics, the internet and physical space, colonial government structures and liberation, the future and the present.

Throughout the interview, Brine uses some terms that he has coined such as nevent, Alan, and antity. Please find definitions of these words in the VECTOR glossary. Further information about the concept behind VECTOR can be found in Brine’s artist statement and updates from the The Government of The Satanic State of VECTOR are also available online.

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Paul Weiner:
Tell us a little about the way VECTOR Gallery and your title, Crown Prince of Hell, came to be.

JJ Brine:
Eye have had that title for as long as Eye can remember and VECTOR Gallery came into being when Eye embraced it.

Paul Weiner:
Many religious and pop culture references are made in your work, including a comparison of Charles Manson to Jesus. Could you describe the religious aspect of VECTOR Gallery?

JJ Brine:
VECTOR is itself a religion, and it manifests according to the observation of its own tenets. It reveals the nature(s) of all who engage it, and at the same time it reformats their nature(s) as it sees fit.

Paul Weiner:
Do you see your work as site-specific and strictly contained within VECTOR Gallery or are you open to exhibitions in other gallery spaces or museums?

JJ Brine:
Eye had a militantly site-specific policy for some time but Eye have developed an expansionistic agenda as of late. One recent manifestation of this is my PostHuman Mass Grave.

Paul Weiner:
Describe your PostHuman Mass Grave and how it came to be.

JJ Brine:
It is the Guarantor of the coming events. You have to bait the reality to make it bite.

Paul Weiner:
Could you describe a few of VECTOR’s religious tenets?

JJ Brine:
Shall Eye invert the entirety of Lord Universe in order to describe Lord Universe Itself? Everything is in alignment with its Antity. There is no need for semantic distinction between “is” and “becomes” when We know that everything is happening All at once – The Infinitoment. The AntiChrist is Jesus Christ. Jesus Christ is The AntiChrist.

Paul Weiner:
Do you recruit new members to join VECTOR? How many followers do you have?

JJ Brine:
There are infinite ways to count to One, and there is One way to count to infinity. You might find me saying, in some other time and place: “Oh, but this was all prearranged, Baby.” And that would be true. But Eye have no need for followers, for Eye am herding neither cattle nor sheep! If We are to be together, forever, We need only share a passing thought. And in that thought the entire world is following me, and vice-versa.

Paul Weiner:
Would you like VECTOR to expand outside of New York City?

JJ Brine:
Do Eye have a choice? As if it could be contained…!

Paul Weiner:
Do you see your music and installations as aesthetically linked? Do you create them simultaneously?

JJ Brine:
They are different formats for One incantation.

Paul Weiner:
Do you consider VECTOR to be linked to an exploration of sexual identity?

JJ Brine:
VECTOR can be used as a prism for the exploration of any identity.

Paul Weiner:
Do you believe VECTOR is a forum to disrupt historical cultural norms and offer a new kind of history?

JJ Brine:
Yes.

Paul Weiner:
VECTOR Gallery recently hosted a PostHuman wedding. What other kinds of ceremonies or events does the gallery host?

JJ Brine:
We are linking up the beginning to the end, the end to the beginning. We serve the interests of infinity in its infinite forms. We are especially interested in hosting Nevents – events which cannot and will never take place.

Paul Weiner:
Anything you’d like to add?

JJ Brine:
The Satanic State of VECTOR is looking for attachés to appoint to the following territories: Japan, Tunisia, Yemen, China, Zimbabwe, India, Vanuatu, Sweden, Somalia, Argentina, Ethiopia, Azerbaijan, Russia, Brazil, Haiti, Indonesia, Suriname, Mexico, France, Germany, Syria, Lebanon, and Benin, among others. Please be in touch if you know that We are waiting to hear from you.

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Tutorial on Databending and Glitch Art

Databending and glitch art are intriguing new media art processes that rely on editing the underlying data composing digital images, videos, and sounds to create something new. Conceptually, databending presents opportunities for artists to exploit the imperceivable systems that control the digital world. While glitch art might sound like something only for hackers and the most computer literate people, tools are showing up all over the internet to help everyone make glitch art.

Here’s how it works:

Save an image as an uncompressed file such as .bmp, .raw, or .tiff.

Uncompressed image files contain more detailed data than compressed files such as .jpg extensions. Thus, uncompressed files have more data available to edit than compressed files do, and your image is less likely to completely break when corrupted.

Converting a .jpg to a .bmp, .raw, or .tiff can be done in virtually any image editing software by clicking either “save as” or “export as” and changing the extension of the file. Here, I am using GIMP, which is a free image editing software.

Click “File” and then “export as.”

In the bottom right hand corner of the screen, click “select file type” and scroll down to select “windows BMP image.” Then add a .bmp extension to the file name and click “export.”

screen 2


Technique #1: Audacity

Audacity is a music editing program, but its effects can be exploited to corrupt and glitch your image files.

Download Audacity for free at http://audacity.sourceforge.net/download/.

Open Audacity and click “File” and “New.”

Click “Import” and “Raw Data…”

Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 7.52.00 PM

Select your .bmp file.

Set the Encoding to “U-Law” and Byte Order to “Big-endian.”

Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 7.52.44 PM

Select part of your sound wave, but avoid the very beginning (about .25 seconds) because it contains the header. If you edit the header, your computer won’t be able to read the file anymore.

Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 8.15.09 PM

Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 7.53.00 PM

Click “Effect” and select any effect you want.

Here’s my original image:

denver

Here’s what some of the effects look like:

Echo:

denverecho

Wah-wah:

denverwahwah

Phaser:

denverphaser

Invert:

denverinvert

High Pass Filter:

denverhighpass

Distortion: 

denverdistortion

Click “File” and “Export…”

Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 7.53.37 PM

Set the format to “Other uncompressed files” and click “Options…”

Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 7.53.57 PM

The header should be “RAW (header-less)” and encoding should be “U-Law.”

Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 7.54.16 PM

Save your file and open it up to see your new artwork! If you have any trouble opening the new file, try changing the extension from .raw to .jpg

You can also listen to the sound your image has rendered. Most likely, it will sound kind of like this:


Technique #2: TextEdit (Mac) or Notepad (Windows).

Open the file.

screen 3

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Scroll down at least 1/10 of the way into the file. You should see a bunch of data jargon. The first part of your file is the header. If you edit the header, it will break the entire image.

new5

Now try adding symbols like %, $, {, }, etc. all over the file or copy/paste large parts of the data and move them to new places or delete information all over the file.

 new6

new7

Save the file and open it to see what you’ve created!

Here’s the original image:

tutorialorig copy

Here’s the glitched image:

tutorial


Technique #3: Glitch Art Codes

The easiest way to make your own glitch art is probably to use Georg Fischer’s free glitch editor website, which is available at http://snorpey.github.io/jpg-glitch/. The application is pretty self-explanatory. Basically, there are four levels on which you can adjust your glitch. This process is more intuitive, and you can play around with the sliders until you find an image that you like.

denver-glitched-a96-s9-i26-q61


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