Critique Collective

Critique Collective is your source for information and interviews about emerging and established contemporary artists.

Tag: illustration

Imaginary Creatures by Tony Papesh

Tony Papesh is a painter, illustrator, animator, and director working in San Francisco, California. Papesh’s paintings, which have been seen at the Honey Hive Gallery, are extremely playful, as he renders all kinds of odd creatures from his imagination. Papesh is an accomplished creative in a variety of fields. His animation work has been commissioned by clients such as Google, Youtube, and McAfee Antivirus. Take a look at his website to see his entire portfolio.

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Paul Weiner:
How do you come up with the creatures in your paintings?

Tony Papesh:
I usually pull inspiration from many places, anywhere from old cartoons and video games to heavy metal music and muppets. I just try to make silly and weird creatures that are fun to look at.

Paul Weiner:
Do you have a favorite creature you have painted over the years?

Tony Papesh:
With all the creatures I paint, I tend to make up each one as I paint. I suppose I have painted many similar ones over the years but never took the time to give them names or develop them. In general, I like drawing big, furry, stupid looking creatures. They just seem more fun!

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Paul Weiner:
What materials do you prefer to work with?

Tony Papesh:
Currently, I have been working with a lot of gouache and colored pencil on wood. I do a lot of layering with paints and colored pencil, and the wood seems to take all of the abuse I throw at it. Paper usually curls or wrinkles while traditional canvas feels too fragile.

Paul Weiner:
How do you feel about the rise of conceptual artists on the scene right now? Have you ever found yourself interested or repulsed by theoretical art?

Tony Papesh:
If an artist’s work is worth looking at, it should be seen. I suppose that is just a generic way of saying that I am not quite sure what you are referring to as I am not too hip to the scene at the moment.

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Paul Weiner:
Does the commercial work ever affect your personal art aesthetically?

Tony Papesh:
I would have to say no. The difference between what I do as a commercial artist and my personal work is the difference between night and day. During the day, I am mimicking someone else’s art. I am moving someone else’s text or creating someone else’s ideas. It is a great way to make a living, and you work on some fun projects, but, at the end of the day, nothing excites me more than filling a canvas with my own scribbles, paint, and bad ideas.

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Paul Weiner:
As someone who has worked in multiple creative fields, from animation to fine art, what are some tips for artists who are just getting started?

Tony Papesh:
I have always tried to keep my work and personal art separate. The biggest difference between the two is that when you are working for other people, you are essentially creating their ideas. They have the idea but need someone to make it. When it comes to your own art, you are free to make whatever you want. Don’t get caught up in pleasing an audience. Just please yourself.

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Paul Weiner:
How do you start a new work of art? How does your process vary between fine art and animation or design?

Tony Papesh:
I usually begin with a vague idea in mind. I will have a short phrase, an emotion, or something that I say over and over while painting. It kind of makes me sound like I am some sort of psycho to be repeating the same thing to myself while painting, but, usually, it is just the canvas, myself, and whole lot of time. I tend to get lost in my own head, and before I know it I am wrapping up a painting.

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Paul Weiner:
How did you get involved with making art in a professional way?

Tony Papesh:
I was always drawing, even when I was a little squirt in Illinois. I never really thought too much about doing anything else as a career because I was too focused on art. I always was drawing and painting, but, I guess, I became a professional when someone wanted to start paying me to do it.

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Paul Weiner:
You mentioned growing up in Illinois. How did you end up in San Francisco?

Tony Papesh:
In Illinois, I was always told that if I wanted to be an artist, I would need to move to California or New York. Now, that isn’t entirely true. You can be an artist anywhere, but I kept telling that to myself as I looked for art schools in California. I ended up in San Francisco for a few reasons, but the most appealing to a poor college student was that you could survive without a car.


Please view Tony Papesh’s work online and “like” Critique Collective on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/critiquecollective.

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Simone Rene’s Patterns and Fabric Collage

Simone Rene is a fabric collage artist from Brooklyn, New York who holds a BFA in Illustration from the School of Visual Arts. Her artwork is available online at http://www.simonerene.com/.

11.75"x16", cloth

City Background B5, 11.75″x16″, cloth


Paul Weiner:
When did you decide to begin with the medium of fabric collage?

Simone Rene:
I began working in it about 4-5 years ago. At the time I was doing some mixed-media pieces, paint/graphite/paper/found objects and making clothing, but I couldn’t commit to either because I was torn between my love of fabric and making visuals. I was making a quilt for my nephew, one of my first. It had figures of cute monsters and their toys on it. As I was cutting, positioning, and sewing, the direction I wanted to go in suddenly dawned on me – I know, I know – Duh.

Paul Weiner:
Having studied illustration at the School of Visual Arts, do you see that impacting your style today?

Simone Rene:
I have always loved the figure, and it is pretty central in most of my work. I studied Fashion Illustration in high school and took it at SVA. I think that I am prone to elongating and manipulating the figure to sell the story much the same way fashion illustrators do in order to sell clothing.

The Ancestors A1, 10"x31", cloth

The Ancestors A1, 10″x31″, cloth

Paul Weiner:
The idea of selling a story is interesting, and I can certainly see how fashion is incorporated in your work. So, as far as stories go, do you read your artwork as a narrative?

Simone Rene:
I think of my images as grasping at just a phrase pulled from a whole story, and for me that is where the emotion is.

Paul Weiner:
How do you start one of your fabric collages? It must be tough determining which fabric to use.

Simone Rene:
Usually my concept begins with a thought, words followed by a visual that is accompanied by color. Sometimes I just find a piece of fabric that wants to be something. After I have the concept, I sort through my large fabric collection and go on hunts, both new and used, for just the right fabrics. Once I have the dominant fabric color or pattern, things seem to fall into place. I experiment with combinations and sometimes make variations of the same image. It may take a while, and I may have to return to that image over and over again while I work on other pieces, but it’s ok because art is about exploration.

The Ancestors A5, 12"x31.5", cloth

The Ancestors A5, 12″x31.5″, cloth

Paul Weiner:
Is there a particular color or pattern that has intrigued you?

Simone Rene:
I find myself drawn to black and white patterns, cerulean blues, fuchsia pinks, and flesh tones that are cool – not really into the warm autumn colors.

City Background B3, 15"x27", cloth

City Background B3, 15″x27″, cloth

City Background B1, 17"x21.5", cloth

City Background B1, 17″x21.5″, cloth

Paul Weiner:
You’ve mentioned that your family has resided in Brooklyn since the late 1700s. Could you talk specifically about your “City Background” work and how that relates to your own identity?

Simone Rene:
I grew up embedded in family and surrounded by generations of relatives, both by blood and marriage. We were American, we were New Yorkers, and we were Brooklynites.

When I was little, I don’t ever recall wondering who or what we were. I thought that the diversity of my family was normal. It wasn’t until I began middle school and began to be asked to define myself by ticking off a box that I began to consider “What was I?” note not “Who I was.” It was confusing and disheartening to be asked to define myself and by doing so chance wiping away generations of ancestors that may not be stereotypically present in face or person. It made me a bit of a rebel. I checked all the boxes and when called upon could defend that choice because I knew my family’s stories and history.

I think being generations in the city allowed for the ambiguity that did define my family and I. It allows me to explore aspects of my history with familiarity as well as distance.


Please view Simone Rene’s artwork online at http://www.simonerene.com and “like” Critique Collective on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/critiquecollective.

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